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and the new united states. to 19, 1812, james madison made an announcement of the first were to be declared in the history of the united states. "i exhorts all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as they feel wronged that they exert themselves." and made clear the expectation of showing love of country requires giving support to the war. of a moment of national crisis, patriotism was needed. he fell to justify the conflict to motivate the country to support the war. the stakes were high because although a majority had voted in favor of for not one single member of the federalist party voted to support it. the northeastern federalist took a skeptical view more than seven and western members of the democratic republican party. a conflict with britain over national sovereignty, the american war of 1812 became of test of the strength and meeting of american patriotism. we tend to forget the word 1812 between the revolutionary independence movement and trans formative carnage of the civil war. the war between 12 has a dubious distinction the first to be declared in a
. patriotism and popular culture in the new united states. on june 19th of 1812, james madison made public announcement of the first war ever to be declared in the history of the united states. he said, quote, i.e. exhort all the good people of the united states. as they love their country, as they feel wrong that they exert themselves. madison's call made clear that the expectation of showing love of country required giving support to the war. at a moment of national crisis, patriotism was needed. he sought to justify the conflict to the population at large and motivate the country to support the war. the stakes were high because although a majority in congress voted in favor of declaring the war not one single member of the federalist party voted in support of the war. the ticket very skeptical view of the war, far more so than did southern and western members of the democratic republican party that madison was leading. ostensibly a conflict with britain over the national sovereignty the american war of 1812 dirty quickly became a test or addition. a test of the strengths meaning of amer
coverage of the debate. fareed zakaria gdp is next for our viewers in the united states. >>> this is gps the global public square. welcome to awe of you around the united states and the world. i'm fareed zakaria. first up, kofi annan. the former secretary-general of the united nations and. i'll ask him whether there's any end in sight for that nation's brutal war, then the u.s. isn't the only major power picking a president for the next few weeks. i'll talk with beijing's reporter e van osnos. also i'll talk to the education innovator sal khan, the founder of khan academy about how best to teach our kids. >>> and what does a company with almost 700 planes and tens of thousands of trucks worry about? fuel. i'll sit down with fedex ceo fred smith to talk about the future of energy. that crucial subject, the future of energy is also at the heart of our latest gps special which airs tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. in global lessons, the roadmap for powering america will take you around the world to bring you ideas about energy back home. >>> but first here's my take. the
correspondent ed henry. >> since our founding the united states has been a nation that respects all faiths. we reject all efforts to denigrated religious beliefs of others. >> september 12th, he seems to embrace an idea that his aides will advance over the next two weeks that the ambassador and three other americans were killed in a spontaneous riot over an internet video. he does use the term terror but only in a general sense in context of the september 2001 terror attacks. >>. >> he gives an interview to 60 minutes shortly thereafter. he says nothing that has happened has made him second guess his policies since arab spring. >> i continued to be pretty certain there be bumps in the road. >> because nevada is battleground state. >> he leaves for a campaign trip to las vegas. >> the president of the united states did not postpone a campaign event even though we had been hit. >> i thought that was the biggest strategic mistake of the obama campaign. >> dana was press security in george bush's administration. she is now a fox news host. >> imagine if he would have said as commander in chief, it
was because he was never president of the united states. he was never secretary of state. his highest level position in government of the as ambassador to the soviet union and to yugoslavia. he, himself, would have -- [dogs barking] [laughter] he, himself, would have said these were failed ambassadorships, and, so, why a book on the life of george? my answer, and it's only my answer, it would not be universally agreed with, seems it me, is it's good to write a book about someone who saved western civilization, and while it may be something of an exaggeration to say george kennan saved western civilization, if you think it through, there is a case to be made in this regard because all civilization, in fact, was in peril in the half decade or so of the cold war. anyone in washington predigging some 50 years ago when nuclear weapons reefed lethal proportions on both sides, anyone predicting with confidence that we were going to get out of this alive would have had an uphill battle to make that prediction, and surveys that were taken in that age suggested that most americans fully expected to d
>>> welcome to "this week in defense news." i'm vago muradian. the association of the united states army's annual meeting kicks off this week amid pressure to slash spending on conferences. we'll talk about the impact of tighter government travel and conference rules. plus, a look at a compact new realtime facial recognition system that troops can use on the move. but first, the pentagon's new cyber strategy unveiled this month by defense secretary leon panetta makes it clear the u.s. military will take preemptive action if it detects a potential cyber attack that would kill americans or devastate american infrastructure. the aim is to make the threat of counterattack a powerful deterrent. is this the right cyber strategy for america? here with answers is irving la- chow the director of the program on u.s. national security in the information age at the the cent for new american security. irving welcome to the program. >> thank you very much. >> what's the importance of this statement especially at this time? >> i think secretary panetta had two goals in mind in issuing the statemen
of the united states ought not accept any soviet control over eastern europe. we ought to deal with each of these countries separately. we ought to pursue strategies with each of them, economic and the rest, that help them pull away from their dependence upon the soviet union. where the soviet union has acted irresponsibly, as they have in many of those countries, especially, recently, in poland, i believe we ought to insist that western credits extended to the soviet union bear the market rate. make the soviets pay for their irresponsibility. that is a very important objective -- to make certain that we continue to look forward to progress toward greater independence by these nations and work with each of them separately. >> mr. president, your rebuttal. >> yes. i'm not going to continue trying to respond to these repetitions of the falsehoods that have already been stated here. but with regard to whether mr. mondale would be strong, as he said he would be, i know that he has a commercial out where he's appearing on the deck of the nimitz and watching the f- 14's take off. and that's an
this serious occur in an administration and have a president of the united states in a situation like this say he didn't know? a president must know these things. i don't know which is worse, not knowing or knowing and not stopping it. and what about the mining of the harbors in nicaragua which violated international law? this has hurt this country, and a president's supposed to command. >> mr. president, your rebuttal. >> yes. i have so many things there to respond to, i'm going to pick out something you said earlier. you've been all over the country repeating something that, i will admit, the press has also been repeating-that i believed that nuclear misses could be fired and then called back. i never, ever conceived of such a thing. i never said any such thing. in a discussion of our strategic arms negotiations, i said that submarines carrying ssiles and airplanes carrying missiles we more conventional- type weapons, not as destabilizing as the land-based missiles, and that they were also weapons that -- or carriers-that if they were sent out and there was a change, you could call them back
. this could go bad for obama. it's really bad to the united states because this is humiliation for the united states. it's bad for chris stevens and bad for sae9sdz smith and bad for tyrone woods. they are dead. they are gone. >> which brings us back to lieutenant colonel andrew wood who saw the deadly debacle coming. >> bret: i can tell you are emotional about it. the ambassador was killed, first one since 1979. he is your friend. >> it's a huge thing to have a loss like that. i grieve for his loss. i grieve for the loss that we suffer as our nation. it was our job to defend the compound. >> bret: benghazi attacks staggered america. we now have another reason to mourn on 9/11. a new unmistakable warning. islamic terrorists that brutalized our citizens were well armed killers intent on doing us great harm. the brave americans in libya knew that long before we died. the rest of us owe it on to them to under that, too. that is our program. i'm bret baier. thanks for watching. card gives you a 50% annual bonus. and everyone likes 50% more [ russian accent ] rubles. eh, eheh, eh, eh. [ brooklyn a
in the united states, christians love jesus but so do buddhists and jews and hindus and people without any religion whatsoever. >> the jesus image is multiadaptble because we are a 3489 religious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put jesus on the national agenda andn people of all different religions and without anyt all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began your book with? >> well, presumably it's no because he didn't have anything else to do, i mean, he was a pretty busy guy in the white house but he ordered a couple books from england, a couple bibles and he sat there in the white house and he cut and pasted and took out the miracles and took out the resurrection. he believed jesus was a good guy, he believed he was one of the most important philosophers ever but he didn't like christianity and he was able to separate out christianity from jesus, say no to christianity and say yes to yeast. >> ho
later, the ambassador to the united states at the time, he called me up and he was also a friend that also an academic in the past at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador and he said david. i had long forgotten about this whole thing. i said what phone? he said the president wants to meet with you. and so i met with him in may and in june of that year extensively i interviewed his life and the other syrian official. see what was the first meeting like? >> well after i explained why it wanted i wanted to do this, i went, my first substantive talk with him was mr. president you know i'm not an apologist for syria. i'm writing this book when you and i'm going to criticize you in this book and he said that's fine. i know you will criticize me. i know that because i'm not perfect and i know that in the past you have criticized my father's policies but you were always fair and objective from their point of view. and then i told him that you know mr. president one of the worst things you ever did. he goes, what's that? you let it know that you liked phil collins, the rock st
legislature. but i'm also a serious guy. i think the presidency of the united states is a very serious office, and i think we have to address these issues in a very serious way. so i hope and expect that i will be liked by the people of this country as president of the united states. i certainly hope i will be liked by them on the 8th of november. [laughter] but i also think it's important to be somebody who is willing to make those tough choices. now, we have just heard two or three times from the vice president he's not going to raise taxes. i repeat, within days after you made that pledge, you broke it. you said, well, maybe as a last resort we'll do it. and you supported legislation this year that's involved tax increases not once, but twice. so that pledge isn't realistic, and i think the vice president knows it. i think the people of this country know it. the fact of the matter is that the next president of the united states is going to have to go to the white house seriously, he is going to have to work with the congress seriously. he can't turn to the congress and blame them for the f
talks about her experience growing up in mexico without her parents immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> host: reyna grande, what is [speaking in spanish] >> guest: [speaking in spanish] the way i grew up knowing [speaking in spanish] was a reference to the united states. but to me, because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. during that time that my parents were gone, working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think my parents were on the other side of those mountains. post a word as you grow up -- which is where we borne? >> guest: i was born in mexico and a little town that nobody has heard of. but when i mentioned, it is three hours away. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came in 1877 when i was two years old and he sent for another three years later. savanna that came in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. poster wanted to come to the unit
inability to understand what's going on in the middle east and the threats that the united states, israel, and our arab friends face and inindicative of a larger problem globally. i think for governor romney to articulate a peace through strength through foreign policy will be a substantial contrast with what the obama administration has failed to achieve. >> everyone's focusing on benghazi at the moment. before we get to this, talk about the world view. look at egypt turning his back on must b mu.you've got russia,e islamists. tell me more about your view of that world view and how you think mr. romney could define it tomorrow. >> well, i think this goes to the basic issue of america's place in the world. do you think as president obama does that america's too strong, that we've had too much influence, that we're kansa disproportionately successful around the worn america that withdraws, that's less assertive will make other nations more favorably inclined to us and make the world more peaceful. that's like looking at the world through the wrong end of a telescope. i think the notion of
in the united states. if you haven't been to the presidio, i think you should try and make that. if you're from out of town, it's a spectacular transition there. so, these golden gate national parks that i happen to be the superintendent of has now become after 40 years the second most visited national park in our country. we get 14 million people a year that come to our parks. it has spectacular coastline, includes muir wood, alcatraz, we get to tell the stories, stories about essentially what you and your predecessors did this this area. our headquarters, fort mason, was the fisherman's wharf area was the port of embarkation for the wars in the pacific. just this week we brought in a world war ii 16-inch bottle ship gun to the marine head lands to put it up at battery townsly which would have been the pinnacle of coastal artillery in world war ii. so, we now have a canon or artillery collection that spans in our park that spans from the civil war to the cold war, including a preserve 19-missile base. some of you also know that during the 1906 earthquake, the army assisted greatly in the respo
participation from city, civilian agencies from all around the region and all of us our fabulous united states military, the coast guard has been fabulous in providing assets to protect everybody out on the bay. it is one heck of a logistics program to get this whole program started and here we are the culmination of nearly a year of planning. we've had exercises, we've had lots of meetings down in san francisco up at the marines memorial, this is a fabulous program, we had a great medical exchange yesterday. senior leaders seminar third year in a row has gotten a lot of attention. we have a lot of new people who haven't been here for the past couple years, we have a lot of people who have been here for the last 3 years, and one of the major consistent people who has been behind this whole program is the chairman of the san francisco fleet week association, general -- major general mike myers who i'm going to ask to come up and make is remarks. >> thank you, lewis. when i accepted the responsibilities for organizing san francisco's fleet week, the guidance given to me by our honorary co-c
look for in the president of the united states of america. i'm proud that important military figures who are supporting me in this race, former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff john shalikashvili, just yesterday, general eisenhower's son, general john eisenhower, endorsed me, general admiral william crown, general tony mcbeak, who ran the air force war so effectively for his father -- all believe i would make a stronger commander in chief. and they believe it because they know i would not take my eye off of the goal, osama bin laden. unfortunately, he escaped in the mountains of tora bora. we had him surrounded. but we didn't use american forces, the best trained in the world, to go kill him. the president relied on afghan warlords and he outsourced that job too. that's wrong. >> new question, two minutes, senator kerry." colossal misjudgments." what colossal misjudgments, in your opinion, has president bush made in these areas? >> well, where do you want me to begin? first of all, he made the misjudgment of saying to america that he was going to build a true alliance, that he w
. >> senator durbin, israel's embassador to the united states says in the "new york times" article israel should not be rewarded with one-on-one talks with the u.s. but instead should get tougher sanctions. >> the president has put together a strong global coalition imposing sanctions on the iranians including not only europe, which made a dramatic impact on the iranian economy but russia as well. it's had impact. this month in october, the currency in iran declined 40% in value. there's unrest in the streets and leaders are feeling it. that's what we wanted to do. this is an indication, a clear indication, the sanctions regime that president obama's put together with israel and many nations around the world is putting pressure on iran to sit down and acknowledge they cannot have a nuclear weapon. it's a positive step forward. >> briefly, why, if we have this information coalition, why not continue talks in the t5 plus one, why one-on-one instead? >> there are many options. i'm not saying one is better than the other. if direct negotiations are a path toward a peaceful resolution with ira
of the united states we have seen york can it is and frankly they scare the shipped out of us. so we were running candidate to be the president. not brian, the canadian government but the people we love our big brother. we are here to help. we did a campaign video in january. it went by role. with media tv it -- to be around the world so we took off with another couple of videos three weeks later we had a deal and this is what we wrote. "america, but better" the canada party manifesto" your continental bff. that is us. the beautiful face of canadair representing 33 million brothers and sisters up to the north that want to see return to the great country used to be and will be in the future. [applause] >> canada up. canada. [laughter] i cannot even get back going in canada. [laughter] someone came north to pick a fight 200 years ago canada apologized for being invaded and we have been fast friends ever since. your strong and popular the country that everyone aspires to be but lately use stopped playing with the team. use started to put on some weight and became the country that people fear
is that chart you showed, by the end of this decade, the united states will be the world's top exporter of oil and liquefied natural gas. >> you can use that to produce electricity which will make the cost of electricity more stable and cheaper in the united states, which could lead to a resurgence of certain industries. >> the natural gas right is very important because it lowers the cost of manufacturing. when you're thinking about manufacturing, when you're thinking about putting up a plant and employing a lot of workers in america, people think the big problem is the wages of the workers. no, the big problem is the cost of energy, and if energy costs dramatically dropped, we would be producing gas for about $2 per thousand cubic yard. in russia, they sell it for $19. we're much cheaper. as a result, dow chemical and places like that are beginning real manufacturing operations in the united states. there is also an environmental benefit. natural gas emits half the co2 emissions of coal. almost everywhere, natural gas is replacing coal. >> a fossil fuel like coal, like oil, president barack
that united states will always seek peace. let me say not only peace, but the united states will always seek solutions to problems. we're a pragmatic people that like to have a problem [speaker not understood] and do something about it. and the other talon the eagle holds arrows to show that the united states understands that if you're going to be successful and effective in seeking peace, you must be strong. and i would say strong, and i'll use that word a little bit more loosely and say competent. you must be able to do things. so, if you take that image and you have objectives on the one talon and capability on the other, and you marry them together, that's what we in the united states have been doing, particularly since the end of world war ii. then there we were having propelled the three worlds to victory. the other of us having seen we had an aggressive adversary on our hands and looking back what a horrible last century or so, we had to do better. and we did it by this iteration of objectives and capabilities. and we put together what has amounted to a global economic and security co
this was not just a popular uprising. in libya, there was no record of popular uprising against the united states. in fact, the united states is highly regarded in most of libya, and particularly in benghazi, this ambassador was incredibly popular in benghazi. secondly, they were well-armed and well-executed attack. it all the markings of a military-style attack. what's most troubling is one of narratives the obama campaign has laid out is bin laden is dead. they bragged about that forever and al qaeda is in retreat. and you start to wonder, did they basically say do not allow any story to emerge that counters that narrative? is that why for two weeks they total us the libyan incident in benghazi was a popular uprising and not a terrorist attack teak because it ran counter to their campaign narrative. i hope that's not true. you said early on in any presidency there's a moment truth. this president had one in iran. after the false elections there, the people took to the streets, and the president refused to line up with the green revolution there. he said he wasn't going to get involved in iran s
of the united states in the arab world, he will -- whoever will win will have to face a totally different wornd world. that policy is different today. you have to face government that were elected and are in power and they don't have to have the same interests. he have to convince them and collaborate and partner with them on shaping their realities closest we can to our views. i'm sorry to say that. president obama will come with his achievements, killing bin laden, hammering al qaeda, actually trying to endorse palestinian and israeli peace process that he couldn't do because of the factors of what's going on on the ground and many other things. what romney will come with is a bunch of insults towards these countries that alienate them before he's in office. even with china. how can he talk to the number two economy in the world, the number one holder of u.s. debt and the country giving loans to emerging markets more than the world bank. how can he talk to them before you're in office in those terms? how do you think they will do? >> a really good point. in the mideast we're dealing with demo
it make these candidates look tough, aggressive, as you would have to be as president of the united states, or does it look like kids having a fist fight in the school yard? which tack do you think they need to take? >> i think the key, is if you can have a debate and argue your points of view, it's more effective behind a podium, having the freedom to wander around the stage and get in each others' face is uncomfortable. but this is about the issues. both men know the issues. one has to defend his positions and the other has to indict him. >> shannon: let's take a quick look at the real clear politics average of the national presidential polls. there is another one today that may not be factored in. but essentially, a dead heat. president obam a47.1% and governor romney 47% tcould not be any closer without being an actual, literal tie. does either one break away? does the final foreign policy debate shift any undecided viewers? >> if i was running the romney campaign, which obviously, i am not and karl rove is a great master, we would be very comfortable with the romney campaign and build
, whether it is efforts in the united states or efforts anywhere on any continent. certainly, i think what is happening in parts of south asia is deeply, deeply troubling. we saw last week in pakistan what happened when a 14-year-old girl was singled out on a bus and shot for standing up for girls' education. i know that she is now in the u.k. receiving the care that she needs to regain her health and go back to hurt important work. certainly, it is critical that those of us who believe only when we live in a world where every person can participate to their full potential is the world we want to see. >> you have definitely found your voice, and you have said that you want to have a public life. is that taking office? >> i don't know. to take office, how have to be elected in the united states. before my mom's campaign in 2008, i would have said no, not as a result of any long, deliberate, thoughtful process, but because of being asked questions for as long as i can remember. >> has america lost a dynasty? >> i don't know about that. i feel a strong call for public service. that is why i a
important and powerful women in the world of finance and the warning for the united states. >>> brewing up profits the ceo who can fix with ales, starts up companies and raising a glad and lending a hand. >> didn't get enough matt damon last week? neither did we. "the wall street journal report" starts right now. now, maria bartiromo. >> here's a look at what's making news as we head into a new week. another blow to investor confidence, a big blunder in the release of google's earnings on thursday. they came out hours before they were scheduled to be released. the company said it was due to a mistake by the financial printer r.r. donnelley which in turn blamed humor error. the earnings weren't even good. they missed on revenue and profit and the stock plummeted. the company announcing the sudden departure of pandit, he was reto be repoliced by michael corps bit, a citigroup insider. i spoke to mr. pandit soon after his resignation and said it was my decision and it was time and after five years i accomplished what i set out to do. after other signs of a technology slowdown and continued do
was the democratic party's nominee for president. >> i love the united states. but i love it enough so i want to see some changes made. the american people want to believe in their government. they want to believe in their country. i would like to be one of those that provides the kind of leadership that would help restore that kind of faith. >> reporter: mcgovern won 17 electoral votes to richard nixon's 520. he had a campaign catastrophe when he had to drop his running malt, after it was revealed that he underwent electroshock therapy for depression. shriver joined the ticket and they pushed for a withdrawal from vietnam. >> the first time i spoke against vietnam, my son was then 9 years old. he is now 19. and faced with the draft. it never occurred to me when i started speaking out against that war, that it would some day catch my own son, 10 days later. >> reporter: president bill clinton said that he believes no other presidential candidate has had such an enduring impact in defeat. two years later, he endorsed hillary clinton and then backed barack obama saying at the time, an obama win would
or heavily reinforced t. i put that on the president of the united states. this is a national security breakdown, before, during and after the attack. >> the obama administration has said there was no actionable intelligence suggesting that an attack was imminent. democrats are pointing to state department documents, released on friday by darrell issa, chairman of the house oversight committee, saying the move endangered libya nationals mentioned in the document, to score political points here at home. >> let's make sure that we understand exactly what did occur. but jumping to conclusions. i think darrell issa does a documentary dump on his web site of sensitive information about those in lib libya what are helping keep america safe t. shows the lengths many will go to to try to politicize this tragic situation. >> an aide to congressman issa says the documents were already listed as unclassified and he charges the committees are trying to, quote, create a distraction, to protect the president. >> jamie: live in washington, molly, thafers very much. >> eric: how will the attack play o
and largest state in the nation to approve this. one decade later, we have full voting rights in the united states. helping newly enfranchised women, a new political movement was founded. >> starting in the 1920's, it was a movement created by the suffragettes moving forward to getting the right to vote. all of the suffragettes were interested in educating the new voters. >> non-partisan, not endorsing candidates >> -- endorsing candidates, getting the right to vote and one they have their voice heard. >> the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage is taking place throughout the state. bancroft library is having an exhibit that highlights the women's suffrage movement, chronicling what happened in california, bringing women the right to vote. >> how long does this mean going on? >> the week of the 20th. people do not realize that women were allowed to vote as early as the 1920's. in the library collection we have a manuscript from the end of december, possibly longer. >> in commemoration of 100 years of voting in california. 100 years ago this year, we won the right to vote. around 1911, this
that the american people had expected that the president of the united states would be able to describe what he's going to do in the next four years, but he can't. >> he seems to be getting some traction with that argument, can you counter it? lay out exactly what president obama would do in a second term? >> sure. george, i think it's pretty clear, i make two points here, one, after a decade of war, both in afghanistan and iraq, the most important thing that we have to do now is bring american troops home and battle for america's future and strength at home. that's the most important point to be made and that battle means doing what has done from president clinton to president obama, investing in the education and training of our work force, investing in our roads and bridges to make we have the 21st century economy built on the 21st century foundation. and then third, investing in the reer as much and development so that we can stay competitive in the new technology and the fundamental research. making sure we have tax fairness where the middle class aren't taking the brunt of the tax system.
the president of the united states out into the public arena, not telling him about an attack in april and june, and, tell me about the consulate attack in benghazi, what do you think about it, and the president said i don't know and i find that inconceivable. and this is going to be a case study, studied for years of a break down of national security, and, failed presidential leadership and senior members of the obama administration, failed miserably and the benghazi, libya conflict was becoming a death trap and the british left and the red cross left, because of the deteriorating security environment and we were requesting additional security and it was denied because we wanted to normalize relationships with a nonexistent government and we should have closed the consulate long before september 11th, or heavily reinforced it and i put that on the president of the united states. this is a nation security break down, before, during and after the attacks. >> chris: we all agree the president doesn't get into the weeds and decided the security level in benghazi, but given all of these warnings, w
throughout the united states. as one of the most highly rated cancer non-profits in the united states, we want to make sure people know the funds they contribute go to serve people and families who are struggling with the financial or emotional or practical challenges that always accompany cancer. >> would you be open at all to giving people their money back, anyone who wants it? i'm sure most people would not want their money back. they would probably think it's going to a good cause. even he said, i'm speaking for myself. would the foundation be open to doing that or is that out of the question? >> i tell you, what i heard loud and clear from mr. birdsong was that he felt the sense of disappointment. and i would just want to reassure mr. birdsong and anyone who's donated to livestrong that they weren't supporting one person. they weren't supporting an athlete or a celebrity. they were supporting millions of people throughout the united states who are struggling with cancer. and that is exactly what their funds were used to support. >> so i take that as a "no". >> well, certainly we want
, the economy will take center stage in terms of how it's affecting people in the united states and how it's affecting people globally. >> do we know where the candidates are right now? >> reporter: well we do, we know mitt romney is here in boca raton. he flipped a coin for a football match between the traveling press corps and some of his aides. we do know that president obama is up in camp david doing his own debate prep. he will be here tomorrow. so they have been focusing all this weekend, all they can on this debate. because martin, as we certainly know, turning in a strong performance can certainly change some minds and right now things are so, so close. >> and let's talk about new polls that have come out, tell us about it. >> reporter: just a few hours ago, we saw this from the nbc/"wall street journal," they put out a national poll and it shows the race is tied, straight up right now 47%/47%, that is nationally. we are focusing on nine battleground states here at cnn and we have seen that the polls in those states are getting a lot closer. but when it comes back to this national
and the united states agreed to one-on-one nuclear talks. joining me, we have alli a blogger and marie slaughter, professor of politics and affairs at princeton and the former policy planner for obama state department. joe sestak from pennsylvania, three star admiral for the clinton national security council and former speech writer for condoleezza rice. the defining moment of tuesday night's presidential debate came between president obama and mitt romney on last month's attack in benghazi, libya. the issue was seen as a slam dunk for romney, but quickly turned into a political disaster. >> the day after the attack, governor, i stood in the rose garden and i told the american people and the world that we are going to find out exactly what happened, that this was an act of terror. >> i think it was interesting, the president said on the day after the attack, he went into the rose garden and said this was an act of terror. you said in the rose garden, the day after the attack, it was an act of terror. it was not a spontaneous demonstration, is that what you are saying? is that what you are saying
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